Cyprus. Crime without Punishment

 28.20

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Description

This book by Dr. P.N.Vanezis consists of a series of lectures given by him and consequently some repetition is unavoidable.

Their main purpose is to throw some more light on the Cyprus Problem and to contribute to the development of study and research in the politics and history of Cyprus.

The Cyprus Problem which goes back many years despite the continuing dialogue still remains a complex, troublesome and dangerous dispute which definitely affects the stability of the Eastern Mediterranean; the relations of Greece and Turkey; NATO’s cohesion as well as the relations of the two superpowers.

It is a historical fact that the twentieth century has been a century of wars and destruction. It has been a century focused on politically expedient solutions of the various international problems, reflecting the interests of the external powers involved in these problems rather than interests of those directly concerned. Contemporary history is replete with examples of international disputes arising from the division or partition of various territories: Ireland, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Korea, Vietnam, Germany, Palestine and Cyprus. The result is suffering, agony and death for millions of human beings.

In his study Dr Vanezis provides a profound analysis of the political, religious and social complexities of the Cyprus Problem, up to beginning of 1988. The author is not only concerned with the description and interpretation of the Cyprus Problem but with its judgement. He exposes and criticises those responsible for the crime that has been commited and which still remains unpunished. He apportions blame where such blame is due.

Dr Vanezis’ critical analysis and clarity of writing make his work of equal interest to the student of the Cyprus Problem and to general reader.

Additional information

Weight 0.558 kg
Dimensions 14.5 × 22 cm
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Foreword

Sir Shridath Pamphal

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